Jump to Main Content
USA flagAn Official Website of the United States Government
Archive

Blogs.Archive

Register

Operating a Restaurant Within the Law: A 101 in Compliance (Part II)

Comment Count:
14

Comments welcome on this page. See Rules of Conduct.

Operating a Restaurant Within the Law: A 101 in Compliance (Part II)

By JenniferD
Published: April 8, 2010 Updated: December 5, 2011

From labor laws to food safety laws and new regulations such as no smoking laws, understanding and achieving compliance with legal and regulatory requirements can have a big effect on the success of a restaurant operation.

Earlier this week I posted part one (focusing on minimum wage, tips, and overtime) in this two-part overview of the federal regulations that impact restaurateurs and links to where yo;ll find more guidance.

This second post focuses on how your restaurant business can understand and achieve compliance with the laws that pertain to youth labor, immigration, food safety and taxes.

Restaurant-Specific Labor Laws

While there are many resources in SBA.gov's Employment Labor Law Guide that help small business owners understand and comply with labor and employment laws, the areas of labor law that are particularly relevant to the restaurant business are child and teen labor laws.

Working minors (under the age of 18) are entitled to the same minimum pay and overtime protections as adults, but they are subject to federal youth employment provisions that limit their work hours and restrict some of the tasks that they can do. You can get more information about employing youth workers at www.youthrules.dol.gov.

If you want to find out quickly and easily whether you are compliant with labor laws, use this quick Restaurant Employer Self Assessment Tool. The tool helps employers comply with the youth employment provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. I-s a handy way of preventing problems and achieving compliance.Read more about employing minors from SBA.gov.

Food Safety 

While health codes vary depending on location, all codes require restaurants to safely handle, store and prepare food. You must obtain a permit from your local environmental health department certifying that your restaurant has met county, state and federal requirements. You’ll need to submit an application around a month prior to opening. They will also require employees to maintain good hygiene. Restaurants are usually inspected once every two years after opening.

Be sure to get a copy of your local health codes, and refer to it frequently to ensure compliance.

Working with Immigrants

The restaurant industry is in the spotlight when it comes to complying with immigration laws. With immigrants representing 10% of all workers employed in food service and preparation, you're going to need to know about the immigration laws that affect your business.Read SBA'gov's  guide to Foreign Workers, Immigration and Employee Eligibility can help.

Taxes and Restaurant Owners

The IRS' Restaurants Tax Center provides advice, guidance and links to the forms yo'll need to stay on top of record keeping, reporting employee tips, and tax forms.

 

About the Author:

Comments:

Hi Jennifer, Running a restaurant with tasty and healthy dishes is the key to run a successful restaurant business as customers looks not only for taste but also for nutritive values also and still there is some percentage who thinks dinning eat is not healthy.
Thank you for taking time to providing a concise article on the other aspect of the restaurant business. I would love to learn more regarding this topic. Bob Davis ---This post was edited to remove a commercial link. Read our discussion policies for more Community best practices.
Thank you for taking time to providing a concise article on the other aspect of the restaurant business. I would love to learn more regarding this topic. Bob Davis ---This post was edited to remove a commercial link. Read our discussion policies for more Community best practices.
This is an interesting article. It makes me realize that running a food business is not just all about the 'money.' There are so many things to consider. ---This post was edited to remove a commercial link. Read our discussion policies for more Community best practices.
This is an interesting article. It makes me realize that running a food business is not just all about the 'money.' There are so many things to consider. ---This post was edited to remove a commercial link. Read our discussion policies for more Community best practices.
It is not that easy to set-up a restaurant or a food business. So many important things are needed to accomplish aside from the government requirements, the inner wanting to succeed is also very important. Hopefully, future restaurateur should take into consideration the toxic-free and preservative-free food for sale. Health is wealth so better to consider this scenario. Food safety first--------------hampersMessage Edited by NicoleD on 09-08-2009 11:52 AM
thanks for this article and resoursesBest regards_________________Custom essay writingMessage Edited by NicoleD on 09-08-2009 11:51 AM
Hello! I do not see a condition of use of the information. Whether it is possible to copy the text written by you on the site if to put the link to this page?my email 47shveden@gmail.commy site: Konferens ArlandaMessage Edited by NicoleD on 09-08-2009 11:52 AM
I think anyone that has the guts to open a restaurant and also make sure everything is run in accordance with the law, deserves a BIG pat on the back. This type of business model can be a very expensive learning curve for any entrepreneur (since 95% of restausrants fail!). Anyway, these are some great tips to keep in mind, if you do not have a decent lawyer to help you out.
So many important things are needed to accomplish aside from the government requirements, the inner wanting to succeed is also very important. Hopefully, future restaurateur should take into consideration the toxic-free and preservative-free food for sale. colon cleanse ---This post has been unlinked. Read about Community Best Practices here. Message Edited by ChristineL on 01-29-2010 10:34 AM

Pages

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to leave comments. If you already have an SBA.gov account, Log In to leave your comment.

New users, Register for a new account and join the conversation today!