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What if You're Not Interested in That Franchise?

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What if You're Not Interested in That Franchise?

By FranchiseKing, Guest Blogger
Published: September 29, 2011 Updated: January 3, 2013

You were so excited. You received the franchise business brochure from the franchisor’s corporate office last week, and ended up almost ripping it up in your haste to open the oversized envelope that it was mailed to you in.

You’re attracted to the franchise model for lots of reasons. You were attracted to this particular franchise for several reasons, also.

These included things like the awesome product that you felt they offered, and the general “feel’ of the place. (You had dined in one of this franchise’s restaurants a few months earlier.)

You really felt, (before you read their brochure) that it was “the one.”

As you dug into their nicely laid-out franchise brochure, you started to learn about their history, philosophy, and operational structure. General start-up costs were broken down for you. While the costs were higher than you thought they would be, you still felt that this franchise opportunity was in your budget.

You were also able to learn more about what it is that their franchisees do as owners of their businesses. You were surprised. And pretty bummed out. Your role as the franchisee of the restaurant franchise you were so pumped about wasn’t at all what you thought it was going to be. And now you had a scheduled call coming up with their franchise development director. You’re *franchise research was beginning.

Your 1st phone conversation with Frank, (the franchise development director) went really, really well. Frank was quite an interesting and engaging character...it was hard not to like him. He was genuinely enthusiastic about the franchise he was representing, and shared as much. He gladly answered your questions, and even shared some of the things that were going on behind the scenes to make the franchise concept even better.

But, you didn’t want to work in the restaurant, (for 14 hours a day on average) for the first two years, as was required. You wanted to hire managers to do that, while you scouted out possible additional locations and do some serious networking and schmoozing at local business functions.

 

But Frank is such a nice guy

It doesn’t matter how nice the franchise representative is. If the franchise opportunity is not what you thought it was, or you just don’t like it, (after you’ve learned enough about it to make that decision) you need to cut your losses as soon as possible. This may sound easy to do, especially if you really like the person at the other end of the phone. It’s just not the time to be what’s known as a “people pleaser.” In other words, don’t just tell this person what you think they want to hear, because you would feel ‘bad” telling them that their opportunity is just not for you. They talk with 20-30 folks a week sometimes, and would rather spend their time working with those that are truly interested.

This is not the time to feel guilty.  Don't worry about the franchise sales department. They'll be fine. As a matter of fact, most franchise development directors that read this won't be mad at me for suggesting that you tell them how you feel, so you can move on.

I've found that the best franchise companies encourage their representatives to move franchise candidates out of the process quickly anyway, if their interest level isn't high enough. So, promise me here, right now; if you’re not interested, tell them, and find another opportunity.

This has to be about you. With over 3,000 different franchise concepts out there to learn about, I have confidence that you’ll find one that can work. 

 

*Non-Government link

 

Check out The Ultimate Guide to Franchises

Buying a Franchise; a Consumer Guide

About the Author:

Joel Libava

Guest Blogger

The Franchise King®, Joel Libava, is the author of Become a Franchise Owner! and is a franchise ownership advisor. He shows people how to carefully choose and properly research franchises.   

Comments:

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Franchises have made many people rich while also incapsulating many people in burden for years. You must make sure you fully understand the risks of a franchise. They definitely help you by almost allowing you to skip any entreprenuerial or startup period, but the long term payoff may not be the same as with a brand new company. However, Setting up franchise locations and then selling them has proven to be a very profitable business.
Once decided to be part of the business world it certainly needs a thorough analysis on what business you wanted to pursue as you are bond with it once exist. There is no doubt that franchise business where are the boss of your own, is a kind of business that can lead you to success once done in a right manner with careful scrupulous research on things needed to consider. Houses in the Philippines
Great post! I?m just starting out in community management/marketing media and trying to learn how to do it well - resources like this article are incredibly helpful. As our company is based in the US, it?s all a bit new to us. The article above is very inspirative, how to show your own genuine enthusiasm and share the fact that your product is useful in that case. if need something to buy? buy it from online store
Thanks for the post. Once in a franchise, your married. Kind of stuck. So, your right. Tons of research and considerations need to be done up front.

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