About Us

Advocacy Brochure (PDF)

Created by Congress in 1976, the Office of Advocacy of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is an independent voice for small business within the federal government. Appointed by the President and confirmed by the U.S. Senate, the Chief Counsel for Advocacy directs the office. The Chief Counsel advances the views, concerns, and interests of small business before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, federal courts, and state policy makers. Economic research, policy analyses, and small business outreach help identify issues of concern. Regional Advocates and an office in Washington, DC, support the Chief Counsel's efforts.

As the federal office responsible for examining the contributions and challenges of small businesses in the U.S. economy, we are constantly looking for answers to small business questions—those that intrigue researchers, challenge business organizations, enlighten policymakers, and vex small business owners. Reference materials published annually include small business profiles for each of the 50 states and U.S. territories, quarterly small business indicators, and The Small Business Economy report.

Advocacy attorneys work within the government, educating regulators about their obligation to consider how small entities will be affected by federal regulatory proposals. The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) and Executive Order 13272 require federal agencies to determine the impact of their rules on small entities, consider alternatives that minimize small entity impacts, and make their analyses available for public comment. The Office of Advocacy gives small firm owners and their representatives opportunities to make their voices heard about rules that affect their interests. Annually, the Office of Advocacy helps small businesses save billions in regulatory costs.

Recognizing that state and local governments can be a source of burdensome regulations, the Office of Advocacy works with policymakers to bring regulatory flexibility to the states. Many states have enacted legislation or taken other steps to strengthen regulatory flexibility for small businesses. Giving small employers a voice early in the process is key to reducing the small business impact of state regulations while increasing regulatory compliance and passing on cost savings. Our Regional Advocates in the 10 SBA regions stand ready to hear from you about small business concerns and to help you level the playing field for small businesses in your state.

  • To provide transparency, Advocacy makes available its annual budget requests, strategic goals, performance reports and plans for the future, as well as related documentation on performance indicators. This information helps stakeholders and the ...
  • Printer Friendly Version Principle 1:  Create legislation that provides flexibility for small business and considers the small business impact. Legislation should not have a one size fits all approach that could adversely affect ...
  • Our staff, listed below, advances the views, concerns, and interests of small business before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, federal courts, and state policy makers. Economic research, policy analyses, and small business outreach ...