Jump to Main Content
USA flagAn Official Website of the United States Government

Labeled as “Old Cooch’s Corn Whiskey” and “Silver Screen Vodka,” Delaware’s ‘The Painted Stave’ distillery’s craft spirits tell the story of its home state’s people and places.

Electronic Submission of ARC Loan Payment Using Pay.gov SBA Form 172

District Office Lending Chart

7(a) Loan Guaranty Program

Lender Name 7a Number of Loans 7a Loan Amountsort ascending
M&T Bank 131 20,485,200
Noah Bank 3 9,778,000
KeyBank, NA 16 7,266,400
NBT Bank, NA 45 6,033,200
Susquehanna Bank 1 5,000,000
New York Business Development Corp. 11 4,825,900
First Niagara Bank, NA 52 4,476,100
Live Oak Banking Company 5 3,443,000
Adirondack Bank 12 2,815,000
Newtek Small Business Finance 2 2,526,000
Wells Fargo Bank, NA 5 2,326,900
Evans Bank, NA 1 2,100,000
Empire State Certified Development Corp. 15 2,061,000
The Huntington National Bank 2 1,990,000
TD Bank, NA 4 1,979,000
Community Reinvestment Small Bus. Loan Co. 3 1,905,000
The Oneida Savings Bank 14 1,856,400
Community Bank, NA 23 1,704,400
Republic 1st Bank 1 1,600,000
Kinderhook Bank 5 1,540,000
The Adirondack Trust Company 25 1,438,400
Glens Falls National Bank & Trust Company 19 1,308,600
Corning Federal Credit Union 11 1,224,800
The Bank of Castile 3 1,063,000
Saratoga National Bank & Trust Company 16 975,000
Berkshire Bank 10 938,100
Citizens Bank 13 887,600
Tioga State Bank 5 840,100
Watertown Savings Bank 5 748,500
Indus American Bank 1 738,000
Compass Bank 1 637,000
Capital One, NA 1 570,000
Five Star Bank 14 561,000
Trustco Bank 4 560,200
The Lorain National Bank 1 423,000
Tompkins Trust Company 4 382,000
Solvay Bank 4 322,700
Elmira Savings Bank 4 256,000
Celtic Bank Corporation 2 225,000
Square 1 Bank 1 175,000
Ballston Spa National Bank 1 170,000
Steuben Trust Company 2 150,500
JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA 4 141,000
Bank of America, NA 2 110,000
Citizens & Northern Bank 2 90,400
The Lyons National Bank 1 80,000
Genesee Regional Bank 1 75,000
The Upstate National Bank 1 50,000
Pathfinder Bank 1 48,000
CFCU Community Credit Union 1 25,000
Empower Federal Credit Union 1 12,000

CDC/504 Loan Program

Lender Name CDC/504 Number of Loans CDC/504 Loan Amountsort ascending
Empire State Certified Dev. Corp. 28 11,059,000
Greater Syracuse Business Dev. Corp. 4 1,202,000
Operation Oswego County, Inc. 1 152,000

District Office Lending Chart

7(a) Loan Guaranty Program

Lender Name 7a Number of Loans 7a Loan Amountsort ascending
The Huntington National Bank 676 90,896,100
U.S. Bank National Association 88 14,147,300
First Finan Bank Natl Assoc 20 12,736,800
Heartland Bank 23 8,003,700
Live Oak Banking Company 7 7,203,500
Celtic Bank Corporation 16 6,261,900
Fifth Third Bank 13 6,003,700
JPMorgan Chase Bank Natl Assoc 53 5,968,400
Ridgestone Bank 5 5,113,400
Certusbank Natl Assoc 3 4,917,000
Vantagesouth Bank 1 4,030,000
The Lorain National Bank 8 3,861,000
Noah Bank 1 3,800,000
First Western SBLC, Inc. 2 3,761,000
Newtek Small Bus. Finance Inc. 3 3,340,000
Firstmerit Bank, N.A. 11 3,336,600
Keybank National Association 15 3,247,000
Insight Bank 5 2,696,700
The Community Bank 40 2,415,900
PNC Bank, National Association 10 2,111,000
Bank of America Natl Assoc 1 2,025,000
West Town Savings Bank 1 1,725,000
Comm. & Savings Bank of Millers 3 1,518,300
TELHIO CU Inc 18 1,483,500
Peoples Bank Natl Assoc 6 1,472,000
BBCN Bank 1 1,400,000
Centerbank 6 1,375,000
Natl Bk & Tr Co. 2 1,150,000
Riverhills Bank 5 1,018,000
Old National Bank 2 1,000,000
The Merchants Bank & Trust Co. 1 850,000
Frist State Bank 3 762,500
1st Cit. Natl Bank of Upper San 1 750,000
First Merchants Bank Natl Assoc 3 665,000
First Financial Bank 5 657,000
The Park National Bank 11 619,300
Ohio Heritage Bank 1 603,800
United Midwest Savings Bank 1 574,000
The Union Bank Company 1 547,500
Mainsource Bank 2 417,500
Community Reinvestment Small B 1 405,000
First National Bank 2 368,000
Capitalsource Bank 1 366,000
Crestmark Bank 1 350,000
Mutual Fed. Savings Bank A Fed 1 344,600
Frist Bank Financial Centre 1 331,500
Columbus Frist Bank 3 330,000
The Bank of Kentucky, Inc. 2 319,500
F C N Bank Natl Assoc 2 300,000
Compass Bank 1 281,000
The Citizens Savings Bank 4 230,000
First Fed. Bank of Midwest 2 221,300
The Bancorp Bank 1 214,000
CFBank 1 200,000
Finance Fund Cap. Corp 1 175,000
New Carlisle Fed. Savings Bank 2 150,000
Cit. Natl Bank of Bluffton 1 140,000
West Central Partnership, Inc. 1 115,500
Grow America Fund Inc. 1 110,000
Wells Fargo Bank Natl Assoc 3 85,000
General Electric CU 1 80,000
Sutton Bank 1 40,000
Golden Pacific Bank Natl Assoc 1 25,000
Mt Washington Savings Bank 1 20,000

CDC/504 Loan Program

Lender Name CDC/504 Number of Loans CDC/504 Loan Amountsort ascending
Hamilton Cnty Devel Company dba Horizon 22 10,007,000
Ohio Statewide Devel Corp 16 9,382,000
Community Cap. Devel Corp 11 8,255,000
Access Bus. Devel & Finance Inc. 2 5,696,000
West Central Partnership, Inc. dba Anchor 3 2,450,000
Cascade Capital Corporation 1 937,000
County Corp Development dba BIZCAP 1 722,000
Northwest Ohio Devel Assistance 1 659,000
Growth Capital Corp. 1 451,000

District Office Lending Chart

7(a) Loan Guaranty Program

Lender Name 7a Number of Loans 7a Loan Amountsort ascending
BUSINESS FINANCE GROUP, INC. (CDC) 31 23,989,000
WELLS FARGO BANK (NAT) 57 20,132,100
M&T BANK (NAT) 106 16,012,200
SUNTRUST BANK (NAT) 21 13,133,800
EAGLE BANK (COM) 28 10,934,000
BB&T BANK (NAT) 21 4,399,300
CELTIC BANK CORPORATION (NAT) 17 4,371,600
SANDY SPRING BANK (REG) 11 3,877,000
PNC BANK (NAT) 12 2,613,100
CAPITAL BANK N.A. (COM) 13 2,460,000

CDC/504 Loan Program

Garcia’s Latin Market (GLM), Morgantown’s only Latin Market, is “Sharing Culture” with WVU students and Morgantown residents. GLM has market shelves stuffed with unique and hard to find ingredients and specialty items like premium tortilla chips and fresh corn and flour tortillas, and more recently has been making authentic daily specials, announced through their Facebook page.

District Office Lending Chart

7(a) Loan Guaranty Program

CDC/504 Loan Program

Lender Name CDC/504 Number of Loans CDC/504 Loan Amountsort ascending
Regional Development Funding Corporation 9 6,544,000
SEDA-COG Local Development Corporation 1 941,000
Bridgeway Capital CDC 2 853,000
Altoona-Blair County Development Corporation 1 773,000
Mahoning Valley Economic Development 1 208,000

District Office Lending Chart

7(a) Loan Guaranty Program

Lender Name 7a Number of Loans 7a Loan Amountsort ascending
The Huntington National Bank, N.A. 181 23,048,700
Enterprise Bank 17 7,915,000
Live Oak Banking Company 7 6,921,200
Regional Development Funding Corporation 10 6,769,000
Susquehanna Bank 4 5,195,000
PNC Bank N.A. 19 4,382,100
First Niagara Bank N.A. 33 3,810,300
First Commonwealth Bank 30 2,777,100
Newtek Small Business Finance Inc 7 2,759,300
Wells Fargo Bank N.A. 6 2,264,000
Manufacturers & Traders Trust Co. 19 2,249,900
Bank of Birmingham 2 2,113,000
Fifth Third Bank 3 1,837,700
Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania 23 1,772,600
Noah Bank 2 1,570,000
Fulton Bank N.A. 4 1,300,000
Ridgestone Bank 3 1,260,000
Dollar Bank 17 1,003,900
SEDA-COG Local Development Corp 1 941,000
Bridgeway Capital CDC 2 853,000
Altoona-Blair County Development Corporation 1 773,000
Pacific Western Bank 1 652,000
The Bancorp Bank 2 536,000
Yadkin Bank 1 491,100
Vantagesouth Bank 2 475,000
Celtic Bank Corporation 3 260,000
Washington County Council on Economic Development 1 250,000
Mahoning Valley Economic Development 1 208,000
Reliance Bank 1 150,000
Mercer County State Bank 1 140,000
Community Reinvestment 1 135,000
First National Bank of Pennsylvania 1 100,000
Citizens & Northern Bank 3 60,000
CNB Bank 2 60,000
U.S. Bank N.A. 1 50,000
Community Bank 1 40,000
Citizens Bank N.A. 2 38,000
Golden Pacific Bank N.A. 2 30,000
Superior Financial Group LLC 1 10,000

CDC/504 Loan Program

Comment Count:
19

Comments welcome on this page. See Rules of Conduct.

Five Things Small Businesses Should Know About Export Control Reform

By ngoriel, SBA Official
Published: August 7, 2014

Editor's Note: This blog first appeared at Commerce.gov on July 10, 2014.

Small businesses are growing at unprecedented rates. They employ about half – 55 million – of the nation’s private workforce and account for 99.7% percent of all employers in the U.S. Through exporting, they have the opportunity to grow even more: two-thirds of the world’s purchasing power is in foreign countries. In a 2013 survey of 500 small business owners, the National Small Business Association (NSBA) found that 63% of participants who did not already export said that they would be interested in doing so, but cited lack of information on exporting as an obstacle for small businesses.

In 2009, President Obama launched the Export Control Reform (ECR) initiative, a significant effort aimed at enhancing our national and economic security through reform of the export control system—a system that had not been comprehensively updated in decades. The Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) administers export controls for commercial and some military commodities and technologies. Now, the President’s ECR initiative is transferring tens of thousands of less sensitive military items from the State Department’s jurisdiction to the more flexible Commerce regulations. Most are parts and components; many are manufactured by small businesses. Moving these items to Commerce benefits small businesses because BIS’s regulations allow for more nuanced distinctions among technologies, destinations, and end users than the State Department’s regulations.

  Here are five things small businesses should know about ECR:

  1. Who is affected? ECR affects second and third tier small and medium suppliers in the defense industry. These sectors include aerospace, military vehicles, marine vessels, space, satellites, and electronics.
  2. ECR eases the financial burden: Currently, exporters subject to the State Department’s International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) pay $250 per license to the State Department, even to export an item that sells for $200. In addition, all manufacturers and exporters have to pay a minimum registration fee of $2,250 per year, even if they don’t export. Commerce, however, is prohibited by statute from charging licensing and registration fees. For an estimated 60% of former State Department registrants whose products are moving to the Commerce Department then, there are no annual registration requirements or associated fees. This directly affects the bottom line.
  3. More flexible regulations: License Exception Strategic Trade Authorization (STA) establishes a license-free zone covering the first export transaction for many parts and components that have been transferred to Commerce. STA provides small businesses with an opportunity to ship license-free to 36 countries, so long as certain safeguards are observed.
  4. How can ECR help you? ECR helps small businesses by increasing the security of supply from small companies that are the second and third tier suppliers, facilitating timely and reliable supplier relationships between U.S. exporters and their foreign customer base, and enhancing their long-term health and competitiveness.
  5. Resources: BIS recognizes that this transition requires considerable outreach and education to affected industries. This is why we work with non-profit educational groups representing small defense exporters, conduct weekly ECR conference calls open industries and companies, and have added interactive tools to our website to help U.S. companies comply with the new regulations under the ECR initiative. In addition, we provide free counseling via phone (Washington DC:  202-482-4811; BIS Western Regional Office:  949-660-0144 and 408-998-8806). We host 30 seminars and events annually, and the BIS website also has a variety of online tools and resources in our Exporter Portal.

About the Author:

ngoriel
Natale Goriel

SBA Official

Hi, my name is Natale and I'm serving as a Moderator for the SBA Community. Our goal is to continually improve this site to meet your needs, so we appreciate your feedback and participation.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to leave comments. If you already have an SBA.gov account, Log In to leave your comment.

New users, Register for a new account and join the conversation today!

Lisa Mattiello started her business as a corner luncheonette in 1997.  It was the beginning of a lifelong ambition to own and operate a business.  From that humble beginning, Lisa opened a catering business that became very successful.  With growth the company’s name changed from Pranzi Catering to Pranzi Catering and Events.  Within five years the business developed into one of the premier catering and event planning firms in Southern New England.

Pages

Subscribe to The U.S. Small Business Administration | SBA.gov RSS