CA 14122-02 One Month Left to Apply for SBA Disaster Loans

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Director Tanya N. Garfield of the U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Disaster Field Operations Center - West today reminded small, nonfarm businesses in 57 California counties and neighboring counties in Arizona, Nevada and Oregon of the May 18 deadline to apply for an SBA federal disaster loan for economic injury. These low-interest loans are to offset economic losses because of reduced revenues caused by the drought in the following primary counties that began on January 1, 2014.

Primary California counties:  Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Lassen, Los Angeles, Madera, Marin, Mariposa, Mendocino, Merced, Modoc, Mono, Monterey, Orange, Plumas, San Benito, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Tehama, Trinity, Tulare, Tuolumne, Ventura and Yolo;

Neighboring California counties:  Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sutter and Yuba;

Neighboring Arizona counties:  La Paz and Mohave;

Neighboring Nevada counties:  Clark, Douglas, Esmeralda, Lyon, Mineral, Nye and Washoe;

Neighboring Oregon counties:  Jackson, Josephine, Klamath and Lake.

According to Garfield, small nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private nonprofit organizations of any size may apply for Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) of up to $2 million to help meet working capital needs caused by the disaster. “EIDLs may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that cannot be paid because of the disaster’s impact,” said Garfield.

“SBA eligibility covers both the economic impacts on businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers that have suffered agricultural production losses caused by the disaster and businesses directly impacted by the disaster. EIDL assistance is available regardless of whether the applicant suffered any property damage,” Garfield added.

The interest rate is 4 percent for businesses and 2.625 percent for private nonprofit organizations with terms up to 30 years. Loan amounts and terms are set by SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition.

Businesses primarily engaged in farming or ranching are not eligible for SBA disaster assistance. Agricultural enterprises should contact the Farm Services Agency about the U.S. Department of Agriculture assistance made available by the Secretary’s declaration. However, nurseries are eligible for SBA disaster assistance in drought disasters.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling (800) 659-2955 or emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339. For more information about SBA’s disaster assistance programs, visit http://www.sba.gov/disaster.

 

 

SBA Field Operations Center - West, P.O. Box 419004, Sacramento, CA 95841

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Release Number: 
CA 14122-02
Release Date: 
Friday, April 17, 2015 - 12:00am
Contact: 
Richard A. Jenkins (916) 735-1500
Related State: 
California
Field Operations Center: 
West