Success Stories

Vermont is quickly becoming known as a destination for high quality brewing as breweries of various sizes continue to spring up across the landscape. One of the latest is Ten Bends Beer in Hyde Park.

Owned and operated by Michael Scarlata and Jason Powell, the 590 East Main Street brewhouse and tasting room recently started serving its craft brewed creations from its 3bbl system, but not before seeking assistance from Vermont Small Business Development Center Area Advisor and craft brewing specialist Charley Ininger.

In addition to being one of VtSBDC’s area advisors, Ininger is also part of the specialty services VtSBDC has to offer. With many years in the food and beverage business and a keen understanding of what it takes to make a brewery a success from concept to creation, Ininger has worked with many Vermont beer makers as the brewing boom continues to expand.

In addition to individual advice and advising, Charley offers a class in the business of brewing... Read More

When March rolls around in Vermont’s Green Mountains many large scale sugar makers are already hard at work tapping trees and boiling sap into the sweet syrup the state’s famous sugar maples provide. But there’s also a cadre of small scale home producers who focus on providing a gallon or two for their family and friends.

Those small scale backyard operations did not go unnoticed by husband and wife team Justin McCabe and Kate Whelley McCabe, who themselves had struggled with finding an efficient way for backyard sugar makers to produce affordable syrup for their families.

“Our young family could not find an affordable fun way to sugar on a small scale given the products on the market – and lack thereof,” Whelley McCabe said. This led them to open the Vermont Evaporator Company, a Montpelier based business that makes small scale maple sugar evaporators for backyard sugar makers.

Priced at $825 the evaporators are far more affordable than many of the... Read More

For more than a century Vermont has been known for its dairy industry, but as the state continues to evolve it is increasingly becoming a culinary destination and value added agricultural food producing hub. As New Englanders and beyond become more and more interested in locally grown and produced foods, Vermont small businesses continue to generate delicious fare while also bolstering our local economy and continuing to build off our agricultural roots.

Ploughgate Creamery in Fayston is a prime example of this tradition and evolution. Owned by Marisa Mauro, the creamery opened in 2008 with a cheese making focus before a tragic fire moved the business to its current Northeast Kingdom location in 2012, the same year the creamery transitioned to butter making.

“There aren’t many butter makers in the United States,” Mauro said. “We produce small batch, cultured, artisanal butter.”

While Mauro was passionate about producing quality foods people would enjoy and... Read More

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